Action for SDGs: Youth Entrepreneurs for Social Good

Young people are the core power to achieve Sustainable Development Goals.  Therefore it is essential to introduce them to the concept of sustainable social businesses and the role of innovation so that they can better lead the innovation in industry and infrastructure and solve social problems through unique innovative ways.

Bangladesh entrepreneurs presented lectures on project promotion, investor’s
attraction, branding construction etc. and provide one-to- one training to help participants design
their business plan.

“Youths show a great sense of social responsibility. They understand the concept of social business and they have their own innovative ideas. I hope that they can put their plan into practice and more exchange opportunities between China and Bangladesh can be organized.”

Lamiya Moshed, Executive director of Yunus Center

China-Bangladesh Social Business Young Leaders Program is organized by Youthink Center and gets support from Yunus Centre, Social Business Youth Alliance, Grameen, Intel and other social businesses in Bangladesh. It is a one-week program where the participants will engage in dialogue with Nobel Laureate and SDGs advocate Professor Muhammed Yunus, visit Grameen Bank, lead a social business in Dhaka and then design their own social business idea.

Students talking with Nobel Prize Laureate and SDGs Advocate Prof. Muhammad Yunus

The student teams undergo three main phases:

  1. Learning: Students learn about social business and the Sustainable Development Goals.
  2. Field Visiting: Students go to different social businesses to learn about their models and practices.
  3. Designing and competition: Students design their own social business and present it to partners and stakeholders.

Feeling inspired to take action?
JOIN the Global Day of Action “We the People #Act4SDGs on Sept 25

On 25th September 2017, 2nd anniversary of the SDGs we are calling for actions across the world to tell people about the global goals and tell our leaders how we are performing. We the People #Act4SDGs.

Read more stories of Action for SDGs from all over the world and be inspired …

 

Action for SDGs: Gender Equality to unleash the full potential of youth

The power of feminist theory and action is what young people need to create understanding across differences and learn how to lead healthy lives and make social change.

Zimbabwe United Nations Association (ZUNA) embarked on the “Different Gender Same Agenda” project. Located in a patriarchal society, gender equality issues are important.

That is why ZUNA firstly engaged in giving an introduction to the project to school patrons and to more than 70 students at the beginning of the school year. Then the book “We should all be Feminists” was given to patrons and students.

The orientation and assessment workshop went further, involving two more schools and creating a wider understanding amongst students and increasing the scope of the project.

Two students from Glenview High School present their research findings.
Credit: Kudakwashe Chinjekure

“Gender Equality is about empowering our young girls to explore their worlds without fear of breaking barriers to reach their full potential” Munesu Mushonga

The aim of the awareness campaign is to create a gender-aware generation that takes into consideration the concept of gender inclusiveness in leadership, community participation, policy and decision making. High school students have a tendency to flock to courses that bridge what they learn in the classroom to the outside world. Educators would make a difference. A social transformation will take a village of teachers, scholars, and activists and there is need to reach out to these groups.

A teacher facilitating a workshop on gender equality with high school students

Teachers and educators need to be capacitated, they need support with age appropriate and relevant content that speaks to their communities.
They need to do more global research on issues of gender and sexuality and bring that knowledge back to their schools.
Organizations and schools need to engage in partnerships on how to bring more gender research into the curriculum design.

The “Different Gender Same Agenda” has assisted in changing mindsets and attitudes of young people in Zimbabwe.

Feeling inspired to take action?
JOIN the Global Day of Action “We the People #Act4SDGs on Sept 25

On 25th September 2017, 2nd anniversary of the SDGs we are calling for actions across the world to tell people about the global goals and tell our leaders how we are performing. We the People #Act4SDGs.

Read stories from all over the world and be inspired …

Action for SDGs: Civil Society takes the lead! Peru and the Agenda 2030 Ambassadors

The 2030 Agenda Peru Ambassadors Program is promoted by The Millennials Movement, the World We Want Platform and the UN Inter-Agency Network for Youth Development – Working Group on Youth and Gender Equality.  The Program aims to facilitate the educated participation of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in the process of dissemination, sensitization, implementation and citizen monitoring for 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals at the country level.

Youths discussing SDGs with the CSO Red de Mujeres Iberoamericanas

Through the program, the participant CSOs members join a capacity-building and evaluation process, deliver actions to sensitize their community the 2030 Agenda and SDGs, articulate their organizational goals with the Sustainable Development Goals and bring the voices and opinions of Peruvian men and women to UN and global leaders through the survey My World2030.

“The 2030 Agenda Peru Ambassadors Program, have allowed us interact with other people with similar ideals as our organization, making us feel that we are not alone, that we are accompanied by other youth who have the same desires to make of this a better world.”
– Jessica Danae Tapia Acero, Youth for Change / Líderes por el Cambio

Facilitating this way is a sustainable and inclusive process to achieve the SDGs by 2030. It is important to mention that the program raises awareness about the importance of gender equality to achieve the SDGs through program curricula and as a transversal matter. As it is hard to think about sustainable development when 50% of the population worldwide can’t give their 100% to achieve it.

Peru’s Youth Ambassadors for the Agenda 2030
Credit: Inpulsa Turismo

In 2016 the program reached 16 regions of Peru where 22 CSOs and 162 of their members became “citizen ambassadors” for the 2030 Agenda. 57 actions on the ground were delivered and 2,557 My World surveys were facilitated.

“The Ambassadors Program for the 2030 Agenda has shown us that it doesn’t matter how small the decisions we make every day are, every single decision in every single regards can actively contribute to achieve SDGs by 2030.”
– Rosario Diaz Garavito, The Millennials Movement

The 2030 Agenda Peru Ambassadors Program promotes participation of the CSOs and visualization of their effort as relevant contributions in their communities. CSOs have been contributing to the development process through their communities for quite some time, but many of them do not relate their efforts as contributions to achieving sustainable development at the national level, as some of them are not even familiar with these international instruments.

ICJ Lima

It is clear that the program contributes to the implementation of Sustainable Development Goals 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) and 17 (Partnerships for the Goals).  The program also includes gender equality approaches that need to be considered while delivering concrete actions to Peru. Peru is a country with different issues regarding gender inequality, according to the last National Gender Inequality Report 2015, the levels of inequality include both economic and political spheres.

Feeling inspired to take action?
JOIN the Global Day of Action “We the People #Act4SDGs on Sept 25

On 25th September 2017, 2nd anniversary of the SDGs we are calling for actions across the world to tell people about the global goals and tell our leaders how we are performing. We the People #Act4SDGs.

Read more stories of Action for SDGs from all over the world and be inspired …

 

SDGs at the German Government’s Open Days

On 26th and 27th August 2017, the German Government held their annual Open Days, this year under the motto “Fancy a date with democracy?”.

People in Berlin had a chance to visit the German Chancellery and the Federal Ministries as well as the Press and Information Office. The UN SDG Action Campaign coordinated an interactive space on the SDGs at the Chancellery Gardens jointly with the German Chancellery sustainable development team and the German Council on Sustainable Development.

Overall, the Open Days attracted more than 120.000 visitors, including families and young people who all had the opportunity to interact with the German federal government and administration.

The Campaign team raised awareness on the Sustainable Development Goals and featured a range of innovative tools for citizen engagement. Children and adults were especially keen to try United Nations Virtual Reality and get an impression of what life is like in Liberia after Ebola, in a refugee camp in Jordan or in the Gaza strip. Many visitors took the opportunity to share their views on the Goals by taking the MyWorld 2030 survey and checking out the views of other citizens from around the world on the MYWorld 2015 and MyWorld 2030 data visualization platforms.

The Open Days also featured the Humans of My World exhibition, which showcases personal testimonies from around the world on why the SDGs matter to the people being quoted.

Read more about the Government’s Open Days 2017 on the website of the German Federal Government here (in German).

Stay up to date and catch the next SDG Action Campaign Hub by following us on Twitter and Facebook.

Have your Say on the SDGs taking the MYWorld2030 survey.

MY World Mexico’s Youth Taking Action in 2017’s HLPF

Written by: Karol Alejandra Arámbula Carrillo, National Operations Coordinator & Jesús Epifanio Vicencio Prior, Content and Writing Division at MY World Mexico.

Last month the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) was held at United Nations Headquarters with the purpose of giving a space to different stakeholders for the sharing of their efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The HLPF is the United Nations main platform for follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SDGs that provides the full and effective participation of all States Members of the United Nations and States Members of specialized agencies. This year’s team was “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world”. The set of goals that were reviewed in depth were Goal 1 (No poverty), Goal 2 (Zero hunger), Goal 3 (Good health and well-being), Goal 5 (Gender equality), Goal 9 (Industry, innovation and infrastructure), Goal 14 (Life below water), and Goal 17 (Partnerships for the goals).

In accordance with Paragraph 84 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Member States decided that the HLPF shall carry out regular Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SDGs which included developed and developing countries, as well as relevant United Nations entities and other stakeholders. The HLPF reviews this year were state-led, involving ministerial and other relevant high-level participants, and provided a platform for partnerships, including through the participation of major groups and other relevant stakeholders.

This year’s VNRs aimed to facilitate the sharing of experiences, including successes, challenges and lessons learned with a view to accelerating the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The VNRs also focused on strengthening policies and institutions of governments and to mobilize multi-stakeholder support and partnerships for the implementation of the SDGs. The VNR countries submitted comprehensive written reports that were be made available in the VNR database. In addition, each VNR country provided main messages summarizing their key findings. In addition, the Secretariat invited all relevant stakeholders to host side-events during the HLPF. In total, 147 side-events, 3 special events, and 10 learning courses and workshops to favor the 2030 Agenda and the implementation of the SDGs were organized. MY World Mexico was able to join events daily and participate in key meetings with stakeholders at the global and national levels.

For this year’s HLPF five team members from MY World Mexico were selected by as a result of their work on the ground since 2016 to represent My World Mexico at this outstanding event.

As result, our participation increased the voices and impact of young people and volunteers of MY World Mexico due to the campaign’s work related to the implementation of SDGs and its monitoring through the MY World 2030 survey. In addition MY World Mexico’s partnerships strengthened with key meetings and approaches (like Ilmi Salminen, United Nations Youth Delegate of Finland; Anne-Sophie Dubrux, United Nations Youth Delegate of Belgium; Adil Skalli, Project Office, Climate Change, Global Goals Camp; Model Assemblies, United Nations Association in Canada; Steve Lee, Executive Director, Foundation for Environmental Stewardship, among others).

We were able to share best practices of implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SDGs locally, nationally and internationally, which were acknowledged by its focus on volunteering. On the other hand our team improved youth advocacy skills and got to explore new opportunities for MY World Mexico to improve and innovate our work (specifically, key points to improve MY World Mexico as a network of youth talent).

We established frequent communication and collaboration with youth around the world, to advocate for the involvement of young people in the governance processes aimed to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SDGs. This included a close dialogue with Mexico’s Presidency to interact on new ways to include youth in SDG action and discussion mechanisms at the national level.

Read MY World Mexico’s Full Report on the 2017 HLPF: here.

Campeones por los océanos – Perú, por nuestros océanos, por nuestro futuro.

Publicado por: Rosario del Pilar Díaz Garavito – The Millennials Movement Founder and CEO

Los océanos ofrecen a la humanidad una infinidad de recursos y beneficios que impactan en la vida de las personas de manera directa o indirecta, además de ser un regulador del clima por excelencia los océanos brindan la posibilidad de dinamizar economías locales, proveen de alimentos nutritivos a las diferentes comunidades, entre otros beneficiosSin embargo este recurso y el ecosistema marino se ven amenazados día a día por diversas situaciones que se presentan en el área terrestre como en los mismos océanos, temas como contaminación, acidificación de los océanossubsidios pesqueros, generan daños en el ecosistema marino impactando de manera negativa en la comunidad global. 

Por lo que, en el marco del llamado global para proteger los océanos, realizado en la Conferencia Sobre los Océanos y las acciones enmarcadas en el Objetivo de Desarrollo Sostenible 14: Vida Submarina, desde The Millennials Movement, organización miembro del grupo de políticas estratégicas de la plataforma El Mundo Que Queremos, nos sumamos a las acciones para proteger este recurso de la mano con el Centro de Información de Naciones Unidas en el Perú CINU Lima, mediante la iniciativa Campeones por los Océanos.

Campeones por los Océanos busca sensibilizar a las y los estudiantes de escuelas en diferentes regiones del Perú sobre la importancia de los océanos, la problemática existente, las oportunidades que este recurso representa y su articulación con la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luego del espacio de sensibilización las y los estudiantes participan de un taller en el cual por equipos formulan propuestas para proteger los océanos desde sus escuelas, las mismas que son sometidas a un proceso de votación por los mismos estudiantes. Una vez seleccionada una de las propuestas presentadas, ésta es tomada por los estudiantes y autoridades de la institución educativa como un compromiso para proteger los océanos desde su escuela. 

El lanzamiento de la iniciativa y primera intervención se dio en el Colegio Mayor Secundario Presidente del Perú – COAR Lima, el 8 de junio en el marco del Día Mundial de los Océanos. Fueron 100 jóvenes quienes participaron de la conferencia de sensibilización que contó con la participación de representantes Centro de Información de Naciones Unidas Perú – CINU Lima, The Millennials Movement y la iniciativa Hazla por tu Playa. Asimismo se difundieron los recursos educativos de la iniciativa La Lección Más Grande del Mundo a las y los estudiantes, quienes también recibieron materiales informativos y participaron de la encuesta Mi Mundo 2030.

Posteriormente una delegación de 40 estudiantes participaron de un taller para desarrollar propuestas y elegir una de ellas como compromiso para proteger los océanos desde su escuela. Así mismo se desarrollaron intervenciones en el Colegio De la Salle en Lima, y en el Colegio de Alto Rendimiento COAR Cajamarca, siendo que en esta última se contó con la participación de la Red Interquorum Cajamarca. Desde la segregación de sus residuos en escuelas, ferias de materiales reciclados, hasta sensibilización de los otros salones de estudiantes fueron los compromisos recabados por nuestros “Campeones por los Océanos”. 

Difundir entre jóvenes las premisas que sustentan la importancia de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible, es una de las principales tareas del Centro de Información de las Naciones Unidas (CINU Lima). Es por eso que para el CINU fue sumamente importante haber organizado una reunión con jóvenes estudiantes del Colegio Presidente del Perú (COAR Lima) precisamente el Día Internacional de los Océanos porque nos permitió no solo ofrecerles información sobre los ODS y en específico delODS 14: Vida Submarina, sino que también nos permitió conocer de sus ideas sobre la importancia de estos objetivos y de su determinación para llevar a cabo una acción concreta. En esta tarea fue importante contar con otros jóvenes, ya comprometidos con esta tarea, como The Millennials Movement. Forjar estas alianzas entre los mismos jóvenes es clave para progresar en la Agenda 2030.” 

Christian Sánchez – Oficial Nacional de Información, Centro de Información de Naciones Unidas CINU Lima

Según el Banco Mundial, el Perú se encuentra entre los principales productores de pesca en el mundo gracias a su ubicación geográfica, que le permite capturar cerca del 20% del total mundial de peces, sobre todo especies pequeñas como la anchoveta. Dicha pesca es de vital importancia para la economía nacional; en la última década ha representado un promedio del 7% del total de nuestras exportaciones.La actividad pesquera aporta al país un alimento nutritivo que contiene 20% de proteínas, lo que supera a las carnes vacuna y avícola, que proveen un 18%. Además, abastece de materia prima a la industria harinera y de aceite de pescado. Su contribución es significativa, pues llega a cerca del 1% del producto bruto interno del país (PBI)1.

Las acciones continuarán en las escuelas de las diferentes regiones de Perú de la mano de The Millennials Movement y otros aliados locales, contribuyendo así con las acciones del movimiento en el marco del compromiso hasta el 2018 para proteger los océanos. Conozca más del compromiso en el siguiente enlace: https://oceanconference.un.org/commitments/?id=16442 

Agradecimientos al equipo de The Millennials Movement y a la organización LigaJoc por realizar las tomas fotográficas. 

#SalvemosNuestrosOcéanos #ODS14 #Perú2030 #Voces2030 #PeoplesActions2030

 1 Fuente: http://www.elperuano.pe/noticia-potencial-pesquero-50659.aspx

MY World Mexico’s Commemoration of World Environment Day & The Ocean Conference

Written by: Jesús Epifanio Vicencio Prior (Content and Writing Division) Karol Alejandra Arámbula Carrillo (National Operations Coordinator) MY World México

One of the key pillars of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is how to protect our planet and secure that future generations enjoy a healthy natural habitat like many of us do. Our environment faces many evident challenges, mainly caused by human activities. These challenges which in many cases have turned into actual issues, have considerable impacts upon human health, biodiversity and climate alterations.

Our country Mexico is a country already affected by theses issues. At the national level, toxic waste; pollution and climate change can be easily identified. Mexico City for example, has one of the highest percentages of annual pollutant emissions in the world. Other cities such as Guadalajara or Monterrey generate around 3.5 and 3% percent respectively. Cities like Mexicali and Tijuana are also among the most polluted cities in the country.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), around 15,000 people die as a result of pollution-related diseases in our country. Mexico also produces an average of 86,349 tons of waste every year, giving this an approximate of 770 grams per person, which mainly occurs in households, buildings, parks and streets. Around 87% of garbage waste is produced in rural communities.

The official statistics provided by the Mexican government, have shown that in the last 3 years, a total investment of nearly $ 1 billion dollars has been done in fighting pollution. Around 44,000 people in our country in the last 8 years, have lost their lives as a result of pollution according to WHO, and 300 children a month die because of air pollution in Mexico.

These statistics replicate themselves as you look into each country’s case. This is why the United Nations has promoted the protection and improvement of environment though establishing June 5 as World Environment Day. The celebration provides the opportunity to develop a basis for well-informed individuals, organizations and companies to promote the conservation of our environment and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. The first time the international community commemorated this day was in 1974. Ever since this day has provided individuals and organizations with a platform of public discussion that aims to preserve a healthy Earth. Each year, World Environment Day revolves around a theme that seeks to place attention upon a particular issue. This year’s theme focused on the relation of people with nature to appreciate its beauty and reflect on how we are an integral part of it.

MY World México through its strong national network, partner with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); the United Nations Volunteers Programme (UNV) and Design For Change to promote actions across the country in favor of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 6, 12, 13, 14 and 15. This aligned with MY World Mexico’s integral strategy to work at the local, national and international levels for the implementation, monitoring, financing, monitoring and socialization of the SDGs in Mexico.

With the support of UNEP, UNV and Design For Change, MY World Mexico launched a call inviting individuals and organizations to promote #SDGAction in favor of the environment. The call reached many organizations and individuals and at the end of the day we were able to register over 30 activities across the country focused on creating awareness and solutions to solve environmental issues at the local level and promote action towards its protection.

Some of these actions included activities such as cleaning of public spaces; reef system tours; conferences and workshops; responsible consumption lectures; reforestations; tours and guided visits to natural parks; among others. Most of the participations were led by high schools, elementary schools, universities, civil society and interested individuals, as well as the private sector. Participant states included Quintana Roo, Veracruz, Yucatán, Puebla, Mexico City, Jalisco, among many others.

In addition to what was being led on the ground, MY World Mexico was also being represented at the first ever United Nations Ocean Conference at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City. Two of our 2030 Agenda Youth Ambassadors, Leonildo Tun Caamal and Patricia Lineth Cervantes Rodríguez were responsible for taking to the United Nations the results of MY World Mexico’s National Voluntary Commitment towards SDG 14 on Life Below Water published by the United Nations Presidency of the General Assembly.

The results so far, have included a total of:

  • 15 coasts cleaned in 5 states of Mexico.
  • 3 reef visits in Veracruz.
  • Over 50 awareness activities such as lectures, workshops, conferences and others.

As MY World Mexico worked with the United Nations Global Survey For A Better World MY World 2030, we were able to identify that SDG 14 on Life Below Water was positioned as the least important in people’s choices in this consultation exercise before the High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development in 2016. This is why the network considered as fundamental to promote #SDGAction and efforts that helped achieved those goals being left behind.

So far, the results have been incredible and people continue to be motivated to work towards the preservation of our environment beyond the dates that commemorate its existence, as well as challenges.  We reaffirmed our commitment to continue to work on towards the achievement of the SDGs, as well as creating and sharing the knowledge, skills and experiences that help others do the same.

Read MY World Mexico’s full report on World Environment Day (Spanish)

A Year of SDG Action: MY World Mexico

Written by Karol Alejandra Arámbula Carrillo
National Operations Coordinator at MY World México

Three years ago when we had the opportunity to implement the United Nations Global Survey For A Better World MY World 2015 in my hometown Jalisco, México we were able to realize people’s interest in being part of the new global development agenda. Back then, I was amazed by people’s willingness to act and help others participate in the definition of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). At the end of the day, having collected nearly 400,000 voices in the survey thanks to the mobilization of 500 young volunteers and 255 organizations, Jalisco was able to position itself as one of the most participative entities in the world in the definition of these new Global Goals.

This also led to make Jalisco’s the first in our country to align its State Development Plan to the SDGs taking into account the MY World 2015 results. Jalisco was also part of the adoption of the SDGs and was also awarded the “People’s Voices Challenge Award” for Best Multi-stakeholder Collaboration in September 2015. The results also had a considerable impact in Mexico’s First National Voluntary Review before the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) in 2016, as a significant input for SDG actions coming from civil society’s mobilization mechanisms.

However, as soon as the SDGs were adopted in September 2015, the big questions for an already highly motivated team made mostly of young people, were “so what comes next?” and “how do we make sure that the SDGs are a reality by 2030?”. Thankfully for us this was also a question raised by the United Nations SDG Action Campaign which had recently transform itself from the United Nations Millennium Campaign and was exploring the different ways in which MY World could be used as a platform to track awareness and implementation on SDGs and monitor progress according to peoples’ satisfaction until 2030.

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(c) MY World 2030 México – UN SDG Action Campaign. School kids hold the SDGs they feel most passionate about.

This is how a group of organizations and highly motivated people supported by the United Nations SDG Action Campaign and United Nations Volunteers in Mexico, decided to establish a national network called MY World Mexico in April 2016. This network, would not only implement the MY World 2030 survey throughout Mexico, replicating Jalisco’s successful strategy, but would also lead actions at the local, national and international levels for the implementation, monitoring, financing, follow-up and socialization of the SDGs in Mexico.

In its first year, MY World Mexico was able to collect close to 30,000 MY World 2030 votes in at least 25 states around Mexico thanks to the efforts of 75 volunteers and 20 Civil Society Organizations. By July 2016, during the first HLPF that would review countries the team was able to provide the United Nations SDG Action Campaign and Mexico’s Office of the Presidency, the first results of the survey. At the same time at the United Nations Headquarters MY World 2030 was officially launched and members of our team were able to present some of the outcomes of this first implementation phase.

Simultaneously at the grassroots level, our volunteers were activating hundreds of other activities that were able to get others engage in the SDGs. The first challenge that the MY World 2030 results showed was that people did not know about the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Around 83% of the people who were surveyed, said they never heard about the SDGs before. The second challenge was that the results of MY World 2030 were quite different from what the MY World 2015 had shown in the past. For example, Water and Sanitation (SDG 6) were among the top priorities, as well as Health and Well-being (SDG 3), which led to identify that people indeed perceive implementation of the SDGs as quite a challenging effort.

Ever since, the network has grown significantly. As of today, MY World México is composed by nearly 60 organizations from academia, civil society, the public and private sectors, as well as 130 volunteers in almost all states in Mexico. The actions and strategies MY World Mexico focuses on are:

  1. Promote and socialize the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with the support of key stakeholders at the local, national and international levels.
  2. Strengthen and expand the participation and commitment of people in the implementation, monitoring, financing, follow-up and socialization of the SDGs in Mexico.
  3. Lead actions in favor of the SDGs through volunteerism and multi-stakeholder mobilization at the local, national and international levels to achieve all goals and targets proposed in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
  4. Empower citizens to they promote actions and activities to tell everyone about the SDGs.
  5. Lead national communication campaigns with key stakeholders of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
  6. Promote the creation of local and inclusive networks for individuals and institutions in favor of the implementation, monitoring, financing, follow-up and socialization of the SDGs.
  7. Co-create and promote accountability mechanisms at the local and national levels by people through ground mobilization and the search of multiple sources, as well as publicly acknowledge efforts and best practices.
  8. Use technology, innovation and creativity to maximize the impact of people’s participation, as well as knowing SDGs progress in the country for information sharing and appropriate use of data.
  9. Lead advocacy actions at the international, national and local levels.
  10. Promote the annual participation of people in the MY World 2030 Survey.

The network has also participated in key advocacy processes in the United Nations, such as:

  • 2016 United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development.
  • 2016 71º United Nations General Assembly.
  • 2017 United Nations Economic and Social Council Youth Forum.
  • 2017 United Nations 55º Commission for Social Development.
  • 2017 1º Global Festival of Ideas for Sustainable Development.
  • 2017 Youth Forum of the United Nations 61º Commission on the Status of Women.
  • 2017 United Nations 50º Commission on Population and Development.
  • 2017 United Nations First Regional Meeting on Sustainable Development of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC)

The network is leading actions across the country on a daily basis to achieve the SDGs. We have also taken into account other projects such as Humans of MY World; Virtual Reality; Hackatons; hundreds of conferences and other mechanisms that allow us to tell everyone about the SDGs and incentive action.

The network has been one of the first partners to sign a National Voluntary Commitment before the President of the United Nations General Assembly for the 2017 Ocean Conference leading 25 coastal cleaning activities; 50,000 MY World 2030 surveys and 87 educational activities to achieve SDG 14 on Life Below Water.

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(c) MY World 2030 México – UN SDG Action Campaign. Coastal cleaning activity volunteer holds SDG14
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c) MY World 2030 México – UN SDG Action Campaign. School kids participate in educational activities around SDG14

We have partnered with initiatives such as TeachSDGs, The Global Goals and The World’s Largest Lesson to use existing creative platforms to engage many others in the process. The network grows by numbers every week and is trying to ensure State and Municipal Committees on SDGs are implemented and that the recently established National Council on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development mandated by the Office of the Presidency includes the participation of all social actors involve in the SDGs. The MY World Mexico’s team took part in the installation of this Council, which is hoped to shape federal policies in the SDGs for the years to come.

A year of great achievements for our time has not only motivated others to participate in the SDGs but has built a solid, diverse and talented team across the country. As one of the first pilot countries of the second phase of MY World 2030 we have been able to secure a place for the SDGs in many people’s hearts and minds, as well as in key efforts in organizations from across sectors. We are certain that MY World Mexico will continue to grow and expand itself to make the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development a reality in our country.

Being able to lead this amazing project has taught me great life lessons, among them realizing how interested young people are in shaping their future. Interest has led to amazing daily actions, which is why I see MY World Mexico as more than a team but a community that has been able to build a strong spirit of commitment to make our country better. We are in contact every day, through every possible mean, making sure we connect our ideas and our work wherever we go. Part of the success of our strategy depends on respect to diversity and willingness to work despite challenges.

We are forever grateful with each and everyone of the individuals, organizations, authorities and United Nations entities that have participated in this one-year journey as MY World Mexico. We could not have done this without out you. We hope to continue to work together for another year of great efforts!

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c) MY World 2030 México – UN SDG Action Campaign. MY World volunteers

To know more about MY World 2030 : myworld2030.org

The SDG Action Campaign recently issued a Global Call for Partners to take part in supporting the MYWorld 2030 survey on Wed 31 May 2017 at 10am EST: Join the MY World 2030 Partner Team

 

 

The SDGs at the Knesset – the Israeli Parliament

Photo: Members of the Knesset, Israel

Source and photo credits: The Knesset

To mark this year’s Knesset Day to Eradicate Poverty, the Knesset – the Israeli Parliament – featured the first Hebrew translated UN Exhibition on the Sustainable Development Goals.

The Knesset is the heart of Israeli democracy. Every day, hundreds of people of all ages, genders, and backgrounds visit the Knesset –a building open to the public– to see and even participate in committee sessions and various events. It was therefore natural for the Knesset to take a leading role in raising awareness on the SDGs to both parliamentarians and the Israeli population.

With encouragement from Knesset Speaker MK Yuli Yoel Edelstein and Director General Albert Sakharovich, the Knesset Foreign Affairs Department works throughout the year with international organizations and parliaments worldwide to exchange views on SDGs and learn from one another, with the goal of eventually realizing Agenda 2030.

SDG exhibit in Hebrew at the Knesset

The Knesset marks various special days throughout the year: LGBT rights day, International Women’s Day, World Food Day, and many more. Although all are related to SDGs, to date, the events have used different terminology. So, to mark this year’s Knesset Day to Eradicate Poverty – which is the number 1 SDG –, the Chair of the Knesset Labour, Welfare and Health Committee, MK Elie Elalouf, was happy to join forces with the Knesset Foreign Affairs Department to introduce the Sustainable Development Goals, through an exhibition designed by the UN SDGs action campaign.

The exhibition was displayed at the Knesset on Tuesday, 21 February. In addition to a prominent display of the SDG logos and selected panels (both translated into Hebrew), SDGs video clips were shown on two screens, and brochures in both of Israel’s official languages (Hebrew and Arabic) were distributed to participants. Coalition and opposition Knesset Members from various parties across the political spectrum joined hands and provided an example to the public by raising awareness of the SDGs, in particular SDG1.

MK Elalouf said, “After heading the Committee to Fight Poverty, my foremost goal at the Knesset was to work tirelessly to end poverty in Israel. To my satisfaction, I was appointed Chair of the Labour, Welfare and Health Committee, which allows me to put the issue of ending poverty at the center of the parliamentary debate and activity. However, Israel does not stand alone in its efforts to end all forms of poverty; this is a global phenomenon, and it is being addressed worldwide. Therefore, when the Knesset held its Day to Eradicate Poverty, it was important for me to highlight international activity on the matter, our part in the global efforts, and the need to exchange perspectives and ideas. We have done that this year by showcasing the UN’s exhibition on the SDGs, which was viewed by hundreds of people who attended today’s event.”

The Knesset plans to continue its efforts to raise awareness of the SDGs, and more activities are expected in the coming months and years. We believe that, by working together, parliaments of the world can realize the vision of Agenda 2030.

Left to right => MK Abdullah Abu Maaruf (Joint List), MK Ilan Gilon (Meretz), MK Elie Elalouf (Kulanu), MK Aida Touma-Sliman (Joint List), MK Meir Cohen (Yesh Atid), MK Akram Hasoon (Kulanu)
Members of the Knesset

Building Bridges Road to Nairobi meets youth entrepreneurs across South Africa

The Building Bridges Foundation has completed traveling through South Africa, its first country on the Road to Nairobi. With its mission to foster youth-led solutions at the grassroots level in order to contribute towards the effective implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the team met with over a hundred youth entrepreneurs across the country. The Foundation’s seeks to learn from grassroots youth entrepreneurs to to understand their day-to-day challenges and how these entrepreneurs have thus far managed to overcome them. 

Samantha Ndiwalana, Building Bridges Project Manager, and Annemarelle van Schayik, Building Bridges Research Manager, report back on the team’s journey through South Africa.


IMG_20160906_142901.jpgThe Building Bridges core team in front of their bus

“African problems, need African solutions” – some South African youth have taken this approach to heart and are fighting for a better future every day. In South Africa there are more than 19 million young people between the ages of 15 and 34 (as defined by South Africa’s National Youth Policy), that is 42% of the population.

Strikingly, among the 9.8 million youth in South Africa’s labour force only 6.2 million were employed and more than 3.6 million youth were unemployed in 2015, with unemployment being especially high for those residing in rural areas. However, most people cannot afford to be unemployed due to the lack of significant safety nets and the responsibility to care for their families.

IMG_20160907_175928.jpgThe Building Bridges team visiting a young poultry farmer in Vredeford

Today’s South African youth were born in the last years of, or just after, Apartheid. Since then regardless of race, color or gender all youth should have the same access to resources and opportunities in theory. However, the lived reality is that black South Africans struggle more than white South Africans, not necessarily solely because of race, but also because of a different upbringing and exposure from a young age.

According to one black youth entrepreneur, “white people have more social capital. At home you can talk about having a business and your parents can introduce you to people who can help you. Most black people don’t have that.”

14053918_1766289320279392_1969452852959175315_o.jpgThe Building Bridges team meets the young entrepreneur behind Sisanda Energy Lab

The MY World global survey led by the UN SDG Action Campaign shows that in South Africa most people want “A good education”. In the past years, thousands of youth have gone onto the streets to stop university tuition fee increases and instead are demanding free education. In a country where many black South Africans are the first of their generation to enter university, keeping up with fees and other university expenses is a challenge. Many drop out before graduating due to “financial exclusion”. Still, a future without a university diploma is seen as one of insecurity and poverty.

South African youth’s priority is not only education, they are also concerned with being taught the skills that will enable them to succeed. “We don’t learn practical skills. There is no talk about running a business up till high school. How can we take care of ourselves?”, remarked one youth.

Youth who drop out of university or do not continue after high school should have learned skills to create a better life for themselves than their parents had. Youth are the future and they all should be given the tools to contribute to a better future for themselves, their communities and South Africa as a whole.

Entrepreneurial innovations should be encouraged from a young age. Schools play a fundamental role in this. A white-collar job is not the only path to success and wealth. As skills training goes underutilized, there are opportunities for individuals with, for example, artisan, technical, electronic or plumbing training. There are many self-employment opportunities in these fields. In fact, South Africa is in need of local entrepreneurs who can create sustainable businesses.

13975260_1765539727021018_91416547130337434_o.jpgThe team meets with youth entrepreneurs in Kwaggafontein

South African youth have great potential to innovate, to change, to create solutions. Of course, being an entrepreneur is not for everyone, but those who have the passion and the drive can potentially learn the skills. Their success is not just on the individual level. It carries through their communities and their nation as they employ other youth.

Youth entrepreneurs not only address issues of decent employment opportunities, but also other striking local problems. Youth are drivers of innovation. On their journey through South Africa the Building Bridges team met, among others, innovative youth who are working on hydroponic farming, an interactive, but informative game about energy and how to handle, a cheaper medical insurance solution for uninsured South Africans.

Youth entrepreneurs are the future. But before changes can be made, we need to understand what the lived experiences of South African youth are and what can be done to enable them to succeed.

IMG_20160907_175938.jpgA Building Bridges event with various youth entrepreneurs in Kwaggafontein, Mpumalanga

Besides a pressing lack of business education from a young age and role models, many black youth entrepreneurs found the access to business registration lacking. We were told time after time that the decentralized government system is confusing and that the entrepreneurs wasted time being sent back and forth from office to office. Others were unemployed and had difficulty paying the needed business registration fees.

One youth entrepreneur stated, “there are a lot of young people who have ideas; they’re really strong ideas that are so powerful. The problem is, you are unemployed, but you’ve been told to open a bank account it is R500 (US$35.28), you’ve been told that to register a company it’s R400(US$28.22), your certificates that you needed, your BEE and your other certificates are quite expensive. And you are unemployed.”

Those that succeeded then found it difficult to get the startup capital needed. They were seen as risks by the banks and government funding was often unavailable for their type of business. However, besides lacking capital, many entrepreneurs also face negative feedback from their communities. Whole families depend on their income. Brothers’ tuition fees, sisters’ mobile data, and of course there needs to be food on the table. Working from 8 to 5 means a stable income and is the desired path by the wider community. All odds are against the young South African entrepreneur to succeed.

Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 14.27.37.pngYouth entrepreneurs from South Africa

So what can be done? Building Bridges asked the youth entrepreneurs themselves. After all they are the experts:

  • Innocentia: “We need to change how things are run. The government offices should guide entrepreneurs. They should be people who are passionate, who care.”
  • Joyce: “The government can subsidize [registration costs]. It is expensive for an unemployed person to pay and there are a lot of procedures.”
  • Xola: “We need an entrepreneurial culture, a critical mass. We need more black entrepreneurial heroes. Youth need to be able to identify with people who are like them.”
  • Vusumuzi: “Banks can create a different loan system. They should invest in the youth.”
  • Major: “We need practical things when going to programs and incubators. The people presenting don’t understand what we go through. They are not entrepreneurs. We should learn from entrepreneurs.”