Harnessing Youth Entrepreneurship in Zimbabwe: Key to a Better Future

Entrepreneurship is the key driving tool for most African economies. It facilitates effective economic growth and development for enhanced sustainability. Most young Zimbabwean entrepreneurs who strive to see a better Zimbabwe in the near future have taken this to heart.

The youth peak bulge has not spared Zimbabwe, as estimates reflect that it is probable that 60% of Zimbabwe’s national population is under the age of 30. Like many other young people in Africa, Zimbabwean youth have been challenged by the predicament of high unemployment rates and limited civic engagement opportunities, amongst other adversities.

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The informal sector dominates the Zimbabwean economy. More youth are now entering the scene with hopes of economic survival, yet the job market is not opening up enough opportunities for them. This has been lamented by many youth entrepreneurs. Despite many of them having received a good education, some are still unable to find stable, formal jobs.

Most universities are churning out more graduates than the economy can sustainably accommodate in its current state. However, many of the schools are also channeling out students who have more book knowledge than the technical skills required for self-sufficiency in the current market.


The MY World global survey shows that in Zimbabwe most people want a good education. The sampled entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe reinforced this. They want to see an education system which explores more and delves deeper into instilling an entrepreneurial mindset in its curriculum. They wish to have an education system which is not over-reliant on job acquisition immediately following graduation, but one that instead focuses on acquiring a set of business skills which will help in the development and sustenance of entrepreneurial ventures. It is with this notion that the entrepreneurial spirit could be embraced and fueled by graduates, or within the universities’ immediate communities.

The exact unemployment rate in Zimbabwe is currently unknown, but estimates as high as 95% have been calculated for the country. Youths face an uncertain future, but for many of them hope has been rekindled with the surge of entrepreneurial ventures. The hope is to create self-employment opportunities that will lead to a constant revenue flow, allowing sustainability in line with household expectations.

The Building Bridges’ Road to Nairobi 2016 project seeks to harness the spirit of entrepreneurship within all youth to inspire hope for the future, in which effective growth and sustenance is in reach.


Zimbabwean youth entrepreneurs face a range of challenges such as lack of financial assistance and restrictive government regulations on company registration. These difficulties hinder them from seeing their dreams as viable ventures.

Despite the many struggles that youth encounter along the way in changing the current economic landscape, they continue to shed light on the hope that entrepreneurship is key to a better future. From the exuberant energy exhibited by most entrepreneurs, it has been established that youth have the innovation and energy that is required to drive successful enterprises and entrepreneurial ventures

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Youth are characterized as vibrant, go-getters and enthusiastic, and such energy if well applied, will lead into the successful implementation of the SDGs. Zimbabwean entrepreneurs are working on challenges they identify in their communities, such as the lack of access to basic education, unaffordable healthcare, health problems due to poor cooking fuels and many more.  

The future is in the hands of youth who define and map the journey that lies ahead. It is with this notion that youth could be effectively equipped with the necessary business skills to be the ones to see through the successful implementation of the SDGs.

These are a few of the solutions to improve the entrepreneurial spirit amongst youth in Zimbabwe deduced from the hearts and minds of the surveyed entrepreneurs:

  • Terrence: Government should create an enabling environment, incentivize people through the creation of funding structures, and build a strong database for youth entrepreneurs to access mentorship who will oversee the successful running of the businesses.
  • Candice: Youth should be made aware of the beauty of entrepreneurship. People have great ideas but they can’t develop them without assistance.
  • Shaun: Government could have proxies in youth businesses to ensure that they are run sustainably. This way you can give funds and ensure they will be paid back.
  • Tinashe: Entrepreneurship should be made part of the curriculum. The youth needs to get inspired, motivated.
  • Tichaona: We need a hub for entrepreneurs. We need IT skills and to make changes through technology.
  •  Chiedza: We need a transparent government where ministers are held accountable. They should focus on advancement of the country rather than how much they can make by helping you.

Author: Kudzanai Chimhanda (Country Team Zimbabwe of the the Building Bridges Foundation)


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Championing Youth Entrepreneurship in Mozambique with Building Bridges

img_2571The Road to Nairobi 2016 Project, with the support of the local World Economic Forum’s Global Shaper Hub, traveled around the greater Maputo area to meet 10 youth entrepreneurs working in a variety of sectors, in order to learn from their challenges and to get a better understanding of their lived experiences. The ventures discovered ranged from a tech startup working on information asymmetry in the labor market, to a design firm which transforms waste into materials for interior design. These individual stories are featured on the Humans of MY World photo-narrative blog.


The path of an entrepreneur in Mozambique can be difficult and trying at times; a few of the entrepreneurs we met noted how the economic climate is having an impact on their businesses. Even so, some young people are choosing entrepreneurship as an alternative to looking for a job, where they are confronted by a youth unemployment rate estimated at around 80%. The young people who are resilient enough to try youth entrepreneurship need support, role models and an enabling environment. 

Frederico Peres Da Silva, co-founder of a tech startup in Maputo, recognizes the importance of entrepreneurial role models: “If you are in the [United] States, a CEO understands the value of mentoring a startup. You know why? Because he’s heard of Facebook, he’s heard of Snapchat, he’s heard of WhatsApp. He goes, ‘Oh, what if this is the next Facebook?’ To change that perception in Mozambique you need to have a couple of references in the market. You need to have your champions.”

Graca Machel, SDG Advocate speaks at the Mozambican Building Bridges Forum

Young Mozambicans that have taken to the MY World global survey prioritize good education as one of the key areas where  they hope to see positive improvement. The youth entrepreneurs we met further discussed the current education system and their experiences with it.  However, they are not only focused on education in general, but see the importance of having practical skills and experience in the workplace as the key to success in their entrepreneurial journey.

Lack of technological infrastructure and resources are other challenges to educational access and entrepreneurship in Mozambique. Frederico is using technology to help young unemployed Mozambicans access the job opportunities through their phones.

img_2754Where gaps and challenges exist, young people in Mozambique are stepping up to empowering each other and themselves. Marlene de Souza found that young people were unable to communicate and translate their knowledge into action in the workplace. She started a company which offers training to university students on skills such as how to successfully enter the job market and how to communicate with “attitude,” so that these students can bridge the gap between the academic and labor market.

Diogo Lucas started a business to help SMEs access finance and gave them the tools to mature into sustainable businesses. According to Diogo, this is something SMEs really need: “There are opportunities for small businesses but they’re not developing because there is not enough support, there’s not enough money. Bank finance is hard to come by with all these challenges. When I was travelling across the country I realized that it’s not because they have bad businesses. It’s because people don’t have the skills or the ability to access capital that can help them grow and develop.”


Sázia Souza runs a company which offers tech solutions to companies and private individuals. Twice a month, she and her team trains children on how to use computers. When asked about her passion for technology and education, Sázia said: “Mozambique has a problem when it comes to using technology. People are not prepared for the future. Technology is growing too fast. When you go to some schools, they don’t even have computer lessons. Even the teachers don’t know how to use the computers.”

Youth entrepreneurs in Mozambique are working to carve a bright future for themselves. They are working together and with other young people to support skills development while growing a culture of entrepreneurship. To help them on this path, it is important to understand the Mozambican context as well as the lived experiences of rural and urban young Mozambicans in order to empower them for success. The Road to Nairobi team spoke to youth entrepreneurs and asked them what changes they would like to see to support youth entrepreneurship in Mozambique:

  • Lineu: More young people need to have the courage to start for themselves. I started with nothing and almost 100% of the people didn’t believe in me.
  • Claudio: When you register a business, you are sent from one place to another. The process will be better when everything is in one place. It should take less time and require fewer documents.
  • Wilton: Government must create conditions for young entrepreneurs to develop businesses. Especially fiscal policy because currently, police doesn’t differentiate between being a young entrepreneur or an old entrepreneur.
  • Sides: We need more incubators with people who have been trained to support youth entrepreneurs.

Authors: Samantha Ndiwalana (Project Manager of the Building Bridges Foundation) and Annemarelle van Schayik (Research Manager of the Building Bridges Foundation).

African Youth SDGs Training launch report: Mainstreaming youth in the implementation of the SDGs


On December 29th 2015, the African Youth SDGs Training Program was launched at AFPEFAM’s head office. Thirty participants from youth and women groups, civil society organizations and other associations joined the launch. The training enabled all participants share their thoughts of the SDGs and discuss what next actions to take after the training.

Ntiokam Divine, who initiated the training program, stated that 2016 is a year of sensitization and mobilization of all Cameroonians in support of the SDGs, and youth should be well informed and own the SDGs. Mr. Divine emphasized the contributions of the MY World2015 global survey has achieved in local communities in Cameroon.67, 032people in Cameroon voted on the survey. Education, health care, clean water and sanitation are the top three key priorities. Half of the voters are youth age from 15 to 30.


Jean Njita, Director of the UN Information Center in Cameroon mentioned that the training marked a huge step forward towards the SDGs implementation since January 1st  2016. He pointed out that volunteers are crucial supporting the SDGs in Cameroonian communities through sharing stories in local languages. Such work enables the most marginalized individuals and groups to be included in the SDGs implementation process.


we shall have another world, the world we want, a better world for the future generation.

                                                                                                                                – Jean Njita

In Cameroon and many developing countries, translating the SDGs into local languages is essential to enhance communication effectiveness. AFPEFAM collaborates with partners to translate SDGs into local languages including Ewondo, Shupamum, and Basaa. During the training, volunteers at AFPEFAM shared their experiences and motivation in translating the SDGs into Shupamum, Basaa and Ewondo. They also shared with the audience their understanding of the transition from MDGs to SDGs. Three pillars of SDGs: Social development, Economic development and Environmental sustainability, and the 5Ps: People, Planet, Partnership, Prosperity and Peace, were introduced to the audience.
The next phase of the training program is to establish SDGs Clubs in schools to engage broader audience.


(All participants signed and took pledges)


SDG Action Campaign at the CTAUN Conference 2016: How to tie Education & Action for Achieving the SDGs

Written by Di Cao

On January 22nd, over 500 educators and students from around the world participated in the Committee on Teaching About the United Nations (CTAUN) 2016 annual conference to learn more about the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDG Action Campaign was invited to showcase Humans of MY World data and stories, the World We Want platform, and the UNVR series.

In September 2015, delegates from 190 countries met at the UN headquarters in New York to agree on the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets to guide global development over the 15 years. The SDGs are the most inclusive and transparent goals for the world ever because the consultation process was truly human-centered: 10 million people all over the world have voted for their most passionate goals through the MY World 2015 Global Survey. In this world’s largest survey, “A Good Education” has been identified as the most popular priority among voters across region, gender, and age (See data: http://data.myworld2015.org/). With that said, worldwide educators and administrator are key partners of the SDGs.


The conference acknowledged the significance of taking immediate actions. Anne-Marie Carlson, Chair of CTAUN 2016, said at the beginning of the conference:

“Knowledge and good intentions are not enough. It is vitally important that we act now to bring these issues to the fore in every school’s curriculum, so that, to our children, behaving responsibly and living sustainably will become simple common sense. ”


The mission of the SDG Action Campaign is to empower people from various backgrounds with knowledge and tools to become actively involved in supporting the SDG implementation. At the CTAUN 2016 InfoFair, we brought a comprehensive yet easy-to-start SDG Implementation “manual” for 500 educators, administrators, and students around the world to inspire and help them to plan and make their own SDG actions. (click here to download) The one-page “manual” was welcomed by many of our guests:

We really want to know that as college students, what we can do for the SDGs, where can we get resources and how can we start?— Eayne Castillo, student of Pace University

I believed that many of my colleagues working in schools would find this very helpful.Ruth Nielsen, CTAUN

Ruth later shared with the SDG Action Campaign that we “certainly had the most innovative displays” – thanks Ruth! The SDG Action Campaign also showcased the well-known Virtual Reality films “Clouds Over Sidra” and “Waves of Grace” to the InfoFair. The strong emotions that brought by the films as well as the cutting edge VR technology enhanced people’s understanding of the most marginalized groups. Teachers and professors were eager to use this powerful empathy tool in their future class of SDGs; Students were inspired to organize VR screening events on campus to bring awareness of SDGs among youth.


“This film brings in the truth and reality of Syrian refugees, which is all we need right now.”
— Aliya Bultrikova, Permanent Mission of Kazakhstan to the UN

“I plan to add SDG contents to my curriculum, and this (VR) will be an amazing experience that enriches the learning process.”
— Chris Rhodenbagh, teacher of Democracy Prep Public Schools

“I’m thrilled. I want all my students to watch this!”
—Dr. Kathryn Lawter, Advisory Council Chair of CTAUN

On the same day of CTAUN 2016, we welcomed a group of young delegates from University of International Business and Economics of China discussing SDGs and education with the Campaign. Tim Scott, policy advisor on Environment of UNDP, and Antje Watermann from UNDP Regional Bureau for Asia and the Pacific kindly joined the meeting and introduced the 17 global goals as well as the implementation process in China to the young delegates. The audiences were passionate about the MY World 2030 survey and highly interested in the innovative waste project initiated by UNDP China and Baidu.


Alice Chen presents results of MY World 2015 survey and introduces MY World 2030 to young delegates from China.

In 2016 when the SDGs officially came into force, there really has been no better time than now for global educators to think deeply about how to take actions and to inspire the action of students, to ensure the successful implementation of the 17 goals in the next 15 years. To that end, CTAUN, which has been enthusiastically advocated for the SDGs, passionately addressed the 2030 global agenda in its 2016 annual conference with hundreds of educators and students. The all-day conference gave an explicit overview of the SDGs, discussed topics such as global food security, sustainable food production and consumption. It also addressed environment issues surrounding water, energy use and climate change. From the Campaign’s perspective, we are delighted by this opportunity to speak directly with educators in the field who are inspiring young minds on a daily basis. These young minds will one day become the leaders of tomorrow and the ones to transform the SDGs into reality over the next 15 years.

Jagriti Yatra 2015 – Train ride for a better world

Written by Sailesh Singhal

Ever wonder what can happen on an epic train ride across India to talk about the SDGs? Here’s your answer! I was a part of a Jagriti Yatra journey with 449 other young people to 12 destinations in India to share news on the SDGs and the World We Want. A Yatra takes us along the major challenges and help us shape our own ideas. It dives into the rich cultural heritage that our country is honored with and experience the shift in climate as the train proceeds from South to North. The Yatra is the germinating ground for ideas and exchange of culture. It is a place where individuals from different backgrounds come together and feel the responsibility of being the change. Fifteen years is what we have to create a better society and youth is the Only Catalyst. Yatra teaches us the best to way to contribute. Get down to the society and get our hands dirty!


Journey with a Vision
Jagriti Yatra is a 15 days, 8000 km world’s largest national train journey, which takes selected youth to meet the role models who are developing unique solutions to India’s developmental challenges. It attracts 17,000 registrations through India and some parts of the world of which only 450 of the most qualified are selected for the journey. The train stops in 12 locations and youth delegates have the opportunity to personally meet exceptional change-makers who are transforming India.

Jagriti Yatra has been a transformational journey, which aimed for an equal representation of young women and men to achieve the Planet 50-50 by 2030. Jagriti Yatra had 40% girls and women representation in 2015. During my Yatra (Journey), I had been advocating for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the World We Want platform. Sustainable Development Goals need to be trickled down in the society through the youth body channels and it’s very important for youth to know about the SDGs. Unfortunately, a minority of us know about our vision of 2030. Thereby, it’s essential for us to show a clear vision of the next 15 years before we actually jump right into achieving the goals.


Advocating about SDGs and World We Want 

Gender Equality is not a short-term goal. However, we need to start bringing a shift in the mentality of the people from today by talking about the equal opportunities.

Through the MY World 2015 Survey, we can see that of the 902,300 people who have voted in India, over 400,000 prioritized Equality between men and women, making Gender Equality the number 5 most prioritized issue in the survey.


Young women and men are the carriers of our vision and we need to engage discussions with more young people. The role of young people is not only important as actors in attaining gender equality, but also as partners in creating a world that is equal if we want to achieve the goal of planet 50-50 by the year 2030. Campaigns such as HeForShe, MARD, #YouthForGenderEquality need strengthening as we move towards the SDGs.


Founder of Innokul commits to Goal 5 vision

Life on the train is as busy as it gets! With a packed schedule of debates, presentations and conversations, and a blend of art, music and poetry, Yatris find themselves fully involved at all times. The Yatra sets out to be a life changing experience for us to catalyse that shift in mindset. Not only to you but through you, to millions of youth who are watching this expedition as it curves across this great and beautiful land of ours. When we hear how our inspiring role models have created their institutions surmounting all odds; when we hear of the stories of leadership and courage from our co-travellers, we discovered an India that waits to be unleashed. You are that dynamic spirit that will unleash a new society.



#bringbackourgirls 1 year after – New York City lights up the Empire State Building and vows to never forget!

by Austin Schiano – World We Want 2015 Coordination Associate 

It was a deeply emotional moment when on Monday April 13th at 11:00am in Dag Hammarskjold Plaza across for the United Nations in New York City, U.S. Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (NY-12), joined in solidarity alongside political representatives, members of the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development, and UN leaders to support #BringBackOurGirls after the tragic 1-year anniversary of Boko Haram’s kidnapping of 270 Nigerian schoolgirls from school in their town of Chibok. In a gesture of resilience, the conference was attended by: fellow survivors of violence, local high school students, members of civil society, leaders of faith, international human rights advocates, the public, along with many members of the World We Want 2015 Policy and Strategy Group (PSG).


Rep. Maloney’s firm stance against this injustice, along with powerful words, also drew significant media attention. The Guardian published an article the following day on April 14th, which draws our attention to the global protests of those also outraged by this mass abduction. Congresswoman Maloney proudly announced that on the night of April 14th, the Empire State Building would be lit purple and red in recognition of our solidarity with these young women and their families. Red for #BringBackOurGirls and Purple for Ending Violence Against Women. Rep. Maloney made special note to extend her sincere thanks on this matter, recognizing that this lighted display will be a great awareness tool for all those who can view the tower.

#Bringbackourgirls (source: http://www.360nobs.com/)

Others followed the Congresswoman’s passionate call to “Bring Back our Girls”!! with Dr. Mojúbàolú Olufúnké Okome from #BringBackOurGirls. Margo LaZaro, Co-Chair of the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development (NGOCSD) and PSG member thanked the Congresswoman for her voracity, re-iterating the importance of this message. Indeed it was at a meeting of the NGOCSD, that Congresswoman Maloney was inspired to facilitate this public discussion. Mr. Lawal Mohammed Hamidu, the Minister of Counter Terrorism of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the UN spoke to those assembled, providing an update on the work being done by his country to search for these young women. Many others also made impassioned calls for justice. These included Consolee Nishimwe, Survivor of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda; along with Vivian Adhiambo Onano, Youth Representative & Advisor to UN Women Global Civil Society Advisory Group & African Leadership Academy; Ayana Gay Student & President of St. Joseph’s High School’s “Girls vs. Trafficking Club” and Ravi Karkara Co-Chair of the World We Want 2015 PSG who reminded us of the importance to engage men and boys in enduring this struggle. The image of the United Nations Headquarters in the background of this speech, pushed the crowd on toward substantive action.

In solemn reflection, the High School students in attendance have tied 223 ribbons around the trees and railings that surround Dag Hammerskjold Plaza. This gesture is meant to represent one ribbon for each girl still missing of the original 270 girls taken captive, some of which have been able to escape.

This act of abduction is just a particular instance of violence against women, one that illustrates a trend, which has become all too common in our world. We are severely inhibited in our attempts at development, if we cannot guarantee the safety and right to education, of all our women and girls. This claim is further strengthened by research and reflective data conducted around the topic. Several innovative data visualizations, which display this crucial connection, can be viewed at www.worldwewant215.org/trends.

For those of us that traverse these grounds regularly, and will pass these ribbons as they shall fade in the rain and sun, let us not forget the hopes they represent.

More information can be found at:

Congresswoman Maloney: @RepMaloney

#BringBackOurGirls:http://bringbackourgirls.us/ @BBOG_Nigeria #BringBackOurGirls

World We Want 2015: www.worldwewant2015.org @WorldWeWant2015

NGO Committee on Sustainable Development: http://www.trunity.net/CoNGOSD/ @MargoLaZaro

Consolee Nishimwe: @nconsolee

Vivian Onano: @vivianonano

Ravi Karkara: @ravikarkara

FEMNET: http://femnet.co/index.php/en/ @FemnetProg

My World 2015 in SIMONU Bogotá 2014


Blog by MY World Youth Ambassador, Julián Rodríguez 


UNDP Colombia, the United Nations Information Center (UNIC) Bogota and the Secretary of Education of Bogota  organized the largest Model UN in Colombia  – SIMONU (Simulación de las Naciones Unidas). As a UN initiative, SIMONU was conceived in late 2012 in an effort to bring students together from different background.

In early 2013, 150 schools were convened to be part of this initiative. More than 1500 students from almost 105 public and private schools participated in the largest simulation in almost 40 committees with a wide range of topics. 

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This year, 2100 students from around 220 schools in Bogotá participated in the simulation in 54 committees themed around the Respira Paz campaign (Breath Peace).

10599233_1483983645213824_4150980051162289779_nUndoubtedly, this learning experience is an achievement for Colombian Education. For this reason, the MY World Colombia team participated in SIMONU with two of its partners, doing different activities around the campaign. Almost 2200 people answered the survey and others reflected on the survey in their SIMONU committees. The MY World team also recorded participants sharing what their most important MY World priority was and why. 

10645317_10152264264712134_4508757143881808244_nIn Colombia, MY World 2015 is supported by UNDP Colombia and the Bogota Secretary of Education.  These two organizations have shown their commitment to the Colombian youth with this opportunity to participate in the Post-2015 Agenda. Thank you for the great collaboration, without you this would not have been possible.

Want to learn more about SIMONU Bogota?


أي تونس نريد؟ / The Tunisia We Want


Post by Youssef Cherif  and Aida Robbana, UNITED NATIONS Tunisia

طرحنا هذا السؤال على مئات المواطنين، فوجدناهم مستعدين للإجابة، بل ويقترحون حلولاً. طبعاً تونس ليست كباقي البلدان، فمنها إنطلق الربيع العربي وإثر انتفاضتها تغيرت نظرة حكومات العالم لشعوبها. لكن تحمس الذين قابلناهم للمشاركة، وأملهم في المستقبل، كانت حقيقةً فوق المتوقع.

خذ مثلاً اختيارنا للولايات التي ستشملها استشارتنا. فقد وضعنا، لضيق الوقت، خمسة ولايات للأشهر الثلاث التي ستدوم فيها الإستشارة الوطنية. غير أن الطلبات تعددت في الأثناء وها نحن اليوم نظيف ولايتين إلى المجموع، ولسنا سوى في شهرنا الأول.

كما أن مبادرة الدولة التونسية بتبني “العالم الذي نريد” وتحويله إلى منتوج وطني، “تونس التي نريد”، كانت دفعاً إيجابياً في تحديد مسارنا وحاسمةً في انتشارنا على نطاق أوسع. فقد أخذت كتابة الدولة للتنمية والتعاون الدولي، وزارة الإشراف، إستقصاء “ماي وورلد” وإستمدو منه نسخةً تستجيب إلى الخصوصيات التونسية، وزعت على اداراتهم الفرعية التي وفرتها بدورها لمنظمات المجتمع المدني.

وزار فريقنا حتى الآن ثلاث جهات، ألا وهي بنزرت في اقصى شمال تونس، وصفاقس ومدنين في الجنوب. وكانت اللقاءات تشاركية فيها ممثلو المجتمع المدني والمسؤولون الرسميون.

وقد ظهرت نقاط كبرى ركز عليها أغلب من استشرناهم.

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فالحوكمة الرشيدة، كما ردد عدد من التونسيين، هي ركيزة تقدم كل المجالات الأخرى. كيف نقاوم الفساد عندما تحمي الدولة الرشوة؟ هل يمكن الحديث عن حقوق في بلد لا يقوم مسؤولوه بواجباتهم؟ نجد هنا صدًى لأحد أهم شعارات الثورة التونسية، التي قامت ضد العادات السيئة لتسيير الدولة. وثار بعض المتحدثين ضد البيروقراطية المعطلة للتنمية، خصوصاً فيما يتعلق بالمواطنين بالخارج عندما ينوون الإستثمار في تونس. وطالب بعضهم بضرورة وقف مظاهر التهريب الذي يضر بالتنمية، وبمكافحة الهجرة -سواءً غير الشرعية أو الداخلية- التي تعصف بالشباب، روح التنمية المحلية. وربما كان هدف الدعوة لتشريك المجتمع المدني في كل قرارات السلطة ومشاوراتها، من قبل عدد من المشاركين، تعبيراً عن شعور بالمسؤولية المواطنية في تقويم سياسة الدولة.

Continue reading “أي تونس نريد؟ / The Tunisia We Want”

#REF4Women: Advocating for Women in Development through MY World 2015


By Karol Alejandra Arámbula Carrillo, Youth Advocate for MY World 2015

The Red Elephant Foundation (REF) is an initiative built on the groundings of story-telling, civilian peace-building and activism for gender sensitivity. We recognize the many different challenges women and girls continue to face in today’s world.

As such, we look forward to strengthen our actions in favor of gender equality within the international community. To do so, we have become official partners of the MY World Global Survey on the Post-2015 Development Agenda aiming to position gender equality as one of the top priorities of international development.

REF 1We believe global civil society plays a very important role in the construction and follow-up mechanisms of the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Through MY World, which represents a fundamental tool to share some of our needs and interests as global citizens, we can have a real impact towards the adoption of new global development policies and actions led by the United Nations.

We are a committed group of over 70 volunteers of all ages living in 30 countries. We specifically work on the promotion of online and offline voting in the MY World Global Survey and we have developed different strategies and activities aiming to reach the most vulnerable and isolated communities.

REF 2Our strategy is simple: we create awareness on post-2015 processes among our volunteers and staff, which is expected to gather over 200 votes. We request them to do the same with their family members, colleagues and friends. Once they have completed this step, we ask them to engage in offline voting among civilians of their respective countries, especially in communities where there is limited Internet access. We particularly care about the participation of children and elders.

Continue reading “#REF4Women: Advocating for Women in Development through MY World 2015”

“Have Your Say at the United Nations” Campaign continues to ensure Thai voices are heard

Text adapted from the original Press release by Supavadee Pink Chotikajan, UN Thailand

Since the launch of the 2013 MY World campaign entitled “Mark a Difference,” over 70,000 people in Thailand have participated in MY World survey.  Thailand is among the top 10 countries with the most votes collected in the MY World Survey. This is a result of the strong partnerships between the United Nations Country Team (UNCT) and 60 other agencies in Thailand to promote the MY World.

The “Have Your Say at the United Nations” campaign in Thailand builds on the success of last year.  Its official publicity launch was co-hosted by the UN and Procter & Gamble Thailand Ltd. on 15 July at Esplanade Ratchada, Bangkok.   The event was opened by a beautiful performance by Satit Prasarnmit School singing to the song “Heal the World” by Michael Jackson and “Happy” by Pharell Williams.

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Acknowledging the importance of Thais’ voices, the UN selected Thailand to be one of the 20 countries to launch the “Have Your Say at the United Nations” campaign.  For the first time, this campaign brought the MY World Podiumto Thailand.  Signed by Ban Ki-moon, the UN Secretary-General, the Podium is travelling the world to gather people’s opinions on issues that are most important to them and their families.  “The Podium signifies that the UN will always reach out to hear your voices no matter where you are,” stated Mr. Luc Stevens, UN Resident Coordinator in Thailand.

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